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Introductory Words and Message Count

posted Jun 22, 2014, 5:15 PM by C. Matthew Curtin   [ updated Jun 22, 2014, 5:40 PM ]
Tonight's net came with a good question. A station passed traffic to another, reading over the air,
FIGURES ONE SIX FIGURES ONE ZERO FIGURE ONE FIGURES ONE ZERO AMATEUR CALL WHISKEY ALFA THREE ECHO ZULU NOVEMBER
but the check was 5. Why?

Because our goal is to copy the radiogram "word-for-word, letter-for-letter, and space-for-space" as it exists at the sending station, it's important for sending stations help receiving stations to expect what's coming next. When we say "ONE" then the receiving station is going to write "ONE." If we want the receiving station to write the figure "1," then we need to tell the receiving station "FIGURE ONE."

MPG chapter 2 governs sending messages on voice. In 2.1.5, the document discusses the use of Introductory Words to aid the receiving station. It opens the section,
Introductory words are spoken to alert the receiving operator to a special type of group to follow such as initial(s), figure(s), mixed groups, or amateur call signs... not normal spoken words. The introducer implies that the group is going to be sent one character at a time, letters phonetically if present.

Hence, hearing the traffic,
FIGURES ONE SIX FIGURES ONE ZERO FIGURE ONE FIGURES ONE ZERO AMATEUR CALL WHISKEY ALFA THREE ECHO ZULU NOVEMBER
the receiving station will write
16 10 1 10 WA3EZN

Use of the correct methods, practices, and guidelines helps to keep traffic moving quickly and accurately.
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